Courses

ENST 240 Environmental Justice

The field of environmental justice rests on two central insights: 1) humans are organisms. as such, we are interconnected with and affected by our environments (be it noise, toxins, flooding, green space, etc.). 2) Injustice between humans exists. This injustice manifests in many ways, including how our environments affect us. This course examines these insights together; the empirical, science-based idea that positive and negative effects of environments on human populations is testable and knowable, and the philosophical, humanities-rooted idea that human interactions should be characterized by justice and fairness. Using various social lenses, historical persepectives, and philosophical theories of justice, we examine a series of case studies defined by data, proof, and experience. In the process, we learn that there is much more to the study of the environmnet than a simple focus on wilderness or endangered species. Humans are organisms, too! (1) 1 Unit

Requisites

  • ENSC-101 ENST-103 or ENST-105 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A Dr. Laura M. Hartman M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

ENST 360 Sp Top: Climate Justice

Examination of a special topic concerning the environment. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Any 200-level ENVI, ENSC or ENST course or permission. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A Dr. Laura M. Hartman M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

ENST 406 Independent Study and Research

Independent study or research related to the environment conducted under the supervision of an Environment Program faculty member. (1) 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B Dr. Laura M. Hartman

INQ 120 Thinking Animals

Investigates questions of values, individual and communal, from the standpoint of a particular field of learning. The course will teach reasoning skills through reading, writing and oral communication by linking key works with broader traditions of critical reflections on the good life. Students will be encouraged to explore ways in which they can use the course material for their own reflections on what it means to live well. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 120 and INQ 120.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
F Dr. Laura M. Hartman T/Th 10:10AM-11:40AM