Courses

ENST 103 Intro to Environment & Culture

In order to think critically about Environmental Studies, this course will ask you to question how you describe, explain, and relate to nature through language, ideology, and media. To do this we will examine conceptions of nature drawn from the Humanities: philosophy, religion, literature, and art. An understanding of these disciplines will help us gain insight into contemporary environmental debates. The class will examine some of the following questions: What is our relationship to nature? How does nature have value? How has religion contributed to our conceptions of nature? How has English as a language and literary tradition evolved different ways of expressing our relationship to the natural world? Have recent environmental activists articulated a compelling rhetoric? Links to themes of environmental justice, science of the critical zone, and sustainability, connecting this course to the other two introductory courses for the Environmental Studies Program. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A Dr. Marwood Larson-Harris T/Th 10:10AM-11:40AM

ENST 210 Environmental History

A survey which explores the relationship between history and the environment, with focus on a specific area of the world, and the connection between a people and its habitat through time. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A Dr. Jesse W. Bucher M/W/F 10:50AM-11:50AM

ENST 240 Environmental Justice

The field of environmental justice rests on two central insights: 1) humans are organisms. as such, we are interconnected with and affected by our environments (be it noise, toxins, flooding, green space, etc.). 2) Injustice between humans exists. This injustice manifests in many ways, including how our environments affect us. This course examines these insights together; the empirical, science-based idea that positive and negative effects of environments on human populations is testable and knowable, and the philosophical, humanities-rooted idea that human interactions should be characterized by justice and fairness. Using various social lenses, historical persepectives, and philosophical theories of justice, we examine a series of case studies defined by data, proof, and experience. In the process, we learn that there is much more to the study of the environmnet than a simple focus on wilderness or endangered species. Humans are organisms, too! (1) 1 Unit

Requisites

  • ENSC-101 ENST-103 or ENST-105 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A Dr. Laura M. Hartman T/Th 8:30AM-10:00AM

ENST 360 Environmental Citizenship

Examination of a special topic concerning the environment. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Any 200-level ENVI, ENSC or ENST course or permission. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
E Dr. Laura M. Hartman Th 6:00PM-9:00PM