Courses

ARTH 222 Archaeology of Death in ANE

This course investigates the range of objects, paintings, and tomb types in ancient Egypt and the ancient Near East. The study of these objects provides us with a window to living traditions and social structures. Material covered will include the Royal tombs of Ur; tomb paintings; and human sacrifice.(1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A L. Warden-Anderson M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

BIOL 330 Community Ecology

An exploration of the causes of biological diversity in communities and how diversity and species interactions produce emergent properties that form ecosystem functions. (1) Lecture and Laboratory: 6 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • 1 200-LEVEL BIOL COURSE Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • CHEM-112 OR CHEM-113 OR CHEM-118 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • INQ-240 OR HNRS-240 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • MATH-115 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A R. Collins M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

BUAD 215 Accounting Principles I

An introduction to the field of accounting and to the development of a broad understanding and use of accounting information. PC applications are utilized. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
C A. Mulder M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

BUAD 248 Business Analytics

The objective of the course is for students to develop critical thinking and modeling skills which are essential requirements of the business decision making process. Critical thinking will be practiced through problem identification and solution. Problem solution will require the identification and execution of applicable models and data sets. Thus a main portion of this course will be directed toward determining and finding appropriate data, learning the roles and limitations of different types of modeling tools, and then developing customized models using the appropriate data to solve business problems. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • INQ-240 OR HNRS-240 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • BUAD-218 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • MATH-111 or higher Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • BUAD-215

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B C. McCart M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

BUAD 335 Cost Accounting

The measurement of product cost arising from material procurement and use, employment of labor services, and overhead factors in job order and process settings. Budgeting, standard costs, and other tools for planning and control. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • BUAD-218 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • BUAD-225 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A M. Hagadorn M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

CHEM 111 General Chemistry I

The introductory course in chemistry. (Appropriate for all science majors,including chemistry, biochemistry, pre-medical, pre-dental, pharmacy and paramedical students.Credit cannot be earned for both CHEM 111 and CHEM 117 or for both CHEM 112 and CHEM 118) (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Take CHEM-111L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A K. Noble M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

CHEM 221 Organic Chemistry I

A study of the chemistry of the compounds of carbon. Fundamental concepts of chemical bonding are employed to develop chemical models and to correlate structure-property relationships within and among the various classes of carbon compounds. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CHEM-112 or CHEM-118. Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take CHEM-221L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A E. Hardy M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

CHEM 341 Biochemistry I

A study of the major macromolecules found in biological systems with an emphasis on structure/function relationships, as well as the role of each class in central and secondary metabolic processes. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk; Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CHEM-222 with a C- or higher. Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take CHEM-341L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A T. Johann M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

COMM 101 Intro to Communication Studies

Introduction to oral communication and communication theory. Course includes st udy of various communication models and situations and the processes and techniq ues that function within them. It also e xamines cultural, symbolic, and perceptu al variants and their effects on the com munications process. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B C. Murawski M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

COMM 250 Communication Theory

An introduction to the most important contemporary theories of human communication. This course will explore general issues concerning the nature of theory and communication, the relation between theory and practice, and the influence of culture and gender. Students will critically examine how the communication process contributes to the development of information and meaning, selfhood, interpersonal relationships, social influence, and culture. (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • COMM-101 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Turpin M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

COMM 319 Journalism

A practical introduction to journalism, with special emphasis on reporting skil ls and writing newspaper news and featur es, broadcast news, and public relations products. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • COMM-202 and COMM-250

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A T. Carter M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

CPSC 310 Special Topics: Blockchains

A course offered in various formats, de signed to give students instruction and hands-on experience in an area of applie d computing. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CPSC-170 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Shende M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

CRWR 315 Adv. Creative Writing-Fiction

Development of writing skills in fiction, building upon introductory creative writing courses. Students will also read and discuss works by notable fiction writ ers. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CRWR-215. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A L. Garrison M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

ENGL 240 British Literature

Critical reading and literary analysis of major texts and genres (poetry, prose, and drama) across periods in the British tradition. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A W. Larson-Harris M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

ENGL 332 Shakespeare

Analysis of selected plays with oral interpretation. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Film Laboratory: 2-3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • ENGL-240 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • 1 200-LEVEL ENGL COURSE Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A K. Hoffman M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

ENST 360 Sp Topics: Food Justice

Examination of a special topic concerning the environment. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Any 200-level ENVI, ENSC or ENST course or permission. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A L. Hartman M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

GRMN 101 Elementary German I

A study of the fundamental structures of German, with emphasis on oral proficiency and communication. Includes cultural topics. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. for each; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. for each. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B S. Fowler M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

HHP 160 Fit for Life: Group Exercise

This course is designed to introduce the student to health and physical fitness components related to developing a healthy lifestyle. It will include physical fitness activities, health risk components, assessment, and the development of a personal health and fitness plan. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1/4 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
D2 J. Ferguson M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

HHP 230 Research Methods in HEXS

This course is designed to provide students with an overview of scientific methods in the broad fields of health and exercise science. With a focus on research ethics, research design, sampling, and descriptive and inferential statistical analyses, student will understand the processes by which research questions are generated, evaluated, supported, and presented in oral and written forms. (1) 1 Unit

Requisites

  • HHP-195 or permission.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A E. Ackley M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

HHP 402 Special Populations

This course is designed to provide students with the appropriate knowledge and skills to conduct exercise tests and develop exercise prescriptions for special populations. The course applies models of exercise physiology, movement science and health/fitness concepts and synthesizes them into a coherent framework for working with youth, older adults, pregnant women, and individuals with cardiovascular, metabolic and pulmonary conditions. In addition, this course prepares students for certification through the American College of Sports Medicine. (1) 1 Unit

Requisites

  • HHP-325 or permission.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Artese M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

HHP 415 Eval of Athletic Injuries

This course will provide students with a thorough understanding of the procedures for evaluation of athletic injuries. Emphasis will be placed on the head, spine, and upper and lower extremities. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Admission to Athletic Training major or successful Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • completion of BIOL-230 or permission

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A S. Urbanek M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

HIST 244 History of Ireland

A survey of the history of Ireland from the ancient period to modern times. Our focus will be interdisciplinary, examining politics, religion, economic development, culture, and, of course, the very long Irish relationships with Rome and London. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A G. Gibbs M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

HNRS 110 Forensic Science on Trial

Introduces students to critical thinking in higher education, taking as its starting point a focused topic in a scholarly field. Critical inquiry will be taught in the context of careful reading of important intellectual works, as well as inquiry-based writing assignments. Research and collaborative skills will also be developed in an integrative setting designed to promote a student's journey toward a life of critical inquiry. Includes an engagement component that reaches beyond the classroom. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 110 and INQ 110.) 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
D W. Brenzovich M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

HNRS 271 Why Hitler?

Develops a sense of historical perspective and the ability to use the methodologies of the humanities or the fine arts by exploring a subject drawn from the period from 1500 to the present. Includes an engagement component that reaches beyond the classroom. Open to Honors students or non-Honors students with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.2. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 271 and INQ 271.)(1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A R. Willingham M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

INQ 110 Sport, Not Just a Game

Introduces students to critical thinking in higher education, taking as its starting point a focused topic in a scholarly field. Critical inquiry will be taught in the context of careful reading of important intellectual works, as well as inquiry-based writing assignments. Research and collaborative skills will also be developed in an integrative setting designed to promote a student's journey toward a life of critical inquiry. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 110 and INQ 110.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
J M. Berntson M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

INQ 110 Graphic Novels

Introduces students to critical thinking in higher education, taking as its starting point a focused topic in a scholarly field. Critical inquiry will be taught in the context of careful reading of important intellectual works, as well as inquiry-based writing assignments. Research and collaborative skills will also be developed in an integrative setting designed to promote a student's journey toward a life of critical inquiry. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 110 and INQ 110.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
KK2 K. McGraw M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

INQ 240 Here's to Your Health

Provides an inquiry-focused introduction to statistical methodologies. Students will gain an understanding of how decision making is accomplished using modern statistical techniques. Topics include descriptive statistics, graphical methods,estimation, elementary probability, and statistical inference; students will apply the techniques of data analysis to data sets and statistical studies that address the course theme. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 240 and INQ-240.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A5 J. Minton M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

INQ 260PY The Science of Meditation

Introduces the methodologies of the social sciences through an inquiry-focused approach to a topic. The course seeks to develop students' critical thinking skills through the exploration and application of social scientific methods. Individual sections will be taught in a particular discipline. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 260 and INQ 260 from the same discipline.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A2 D. Hilton M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

INQ 300 The American Dream

Asks students to look back on their experiences and their work in the Intellectual Inquiry Curriculum in order to make explicit, meaningful connections to contemporary issues. In addition to individual written assignments, students will work in small groups to research and develop a proposal concerning a concept, approach, or solution to a problem that will be presented in a formal defense. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 300 and INQ 300.) (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
D S. Baker M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

ITAL 201 Intermediate Italian I

These courses build on the foundation established in the Elementary Italian sequence. Basic grammar and vocabulary arereviewed and more complex grammatical structures and advanced vocabulary are introduced. Emphasis is placed on developing good conversational ability, reading comprehension and composition skills. In addition, elements of Italian culture are woven into the curriculum to promote a broader cultural appreciation of Italy. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B G. Chapman M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

MATH 201 Linear Algebra

Linear equations, matrices, vector spaces, linear mappings, determinants, quadratic forms, geometric applications. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • MATH-122 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A H. Robbins M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

PHST 301 Introduction to Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the sceince of public health. This course is designed to introduce you to the philosophy, purpose, and basic methods of epidemiology. Epidemiology helps us understand how diseases are distributed in populations, including demanding that we investigate and analyze social determinants. If we want to remedy health-related problems and build a healthier, safer social world, this is crucial. Epidemiology lays the foundation for all public health practice. It is a scientific way of thinking about causes and effect. Epidemiology is used to investigate disease outbreaks, determine the natural history of disease, set resource priorities, and develop policies. Basic epidemiologic theory and techniques, applicable to public health practice, will be introduced. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • PHST-201 AND PHST-202 or permission.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A K. Schorpp M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

PHYS 390 Quantum Mechanics

Introductory examination of the wave formulation and notation in solving the time-dependent and time-independent Schrodinger equations including reflection/transmission, barriers, and the hydrogen atom. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • PHYS 203 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A M. Fleenor M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

PSYC 354 Evolutionary Psychology

An examination of the human mind as a set of evolved adaptations shaped to address challenges of survival and reproduction, such as avoiding disease and predators, finding a mate, raising children, and living in social groups. The course emphasizes the most current empirical literature connecting evolutionary principles to human psychology. (1) 1 Unit

Requisites

  • PSYC-101 OR INQ-260PY OR HNRS-260PY

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A L. Osterman M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

RELG 245 Japanese Religions-Global

This course examines five Japanese religious and philosophical traditions - Shintoism, Shugendo, Confucianism, Taoism, and Buddhism. We will read mythological, philosophical, and literary texts from these traditions such as the Analects of Confucius, the Tao te Ching, Dogen's Shobogenzo, and many others, with special attention given to key concepts, problems in translation, and similarities to or differences from western philosophies. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
G M. Larson-Harris M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

SOCI 101 Introduction to Sociology

An introduction to the field of sociology with an emphasis on the study of social groups and how they influence human behavior and society. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
D M. Mehrotra M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I

A study of the essentials of Spanish grammar and basic vocabulary to promote speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Emphasis on developing the conversational skills and cultural awareness to handle topics of everyday life in Spanish. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. for each; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. for each. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
C I. Myers M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM
D L. Cline M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

SPAN 150 Elementary Spanish Review

A one-semester review of the essentials of Spanish grammar and basic vocabulary to promote speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Emphasis on developing conversational skills and cultural awareness to handle topics of everyday life in Spanish. (This course is designed for students who have studied Spanish previously, but lack sufficient preparation to enter Intermediate Spanish 201.) Lecture: 3hrs/wk; Laboratory: 1hr/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
F J. Banuelos Montes/C. Buriak/S. Hord M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

A review of the essentials of Spanish g rammar with the introduction of advanced structures. Continued development of th e four essential skills, and further acq uisition of vocabulary. Emphasis on conv ersational skills to handle situations o f everyday life with increased range of personal expression. Inclusion of cultur al material. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. for each ; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. for each. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
D C. Stanley M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

SPAN 303 Spanish Composition

Practice in written expression with an intensive review of Spanish grammar. Introduction to the principles of Spanish style and techniques of formal writing and translation. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • SPAN-202 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Arias Alvarez M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

SPAN 312 Civiliza & Culture: Span Amer

An overview of the historical and cultural development of Spanish America from its pre-Colombian roots through the colonial era and up to contemporary times. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • SPAN-303, 304, or permission Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A J. Banuelos Montes M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

STAT 210 Statistical Methods I

Data collection and experimental design, graphical and numerical methods for describing data, correlation and linear regression, probability models, random variables, the central limit theorem, one and two sample hypothesis tests and confidence intervals, Chi-Square test, and one-way ANOVA. (1) 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Childers M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

THEA 240 Theatre History I

A study of the history and literature of theatre from its primitive origins to ca. 1700. It covers major developments in production conventions and dramatic literature, with attention given to theatre's connections to society. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A N. Barre M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM

THEA 332 Shakespeare

Analysis of selected plays with oral interpretation. (Cross-listed as ENGL 332). (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. Film-Laboratory: 2-3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • ENGL-240 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • 1 200-LEVEL ENGL COURSE Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A K. Hoffman M/W/F 12:00PM-1:00PM