Courses

ARTH 150 Art Culture & Society I-Global

At a time when few people could read, human-made objects were the primary form of mass communication. Students will explore the architecture, sculpture, and painting of the ancient and medieval Mediterranean world (Ancient Near East, Egypt, Greece, Rome, and Medieval Europe) to discover how the visual arts shaped and reflected the values and concerns of different cultures. (1) Lecture:3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
G H. Silvers M/W 4:00PM-5:30PM

BUAD 142 Personal Finance

This course develops a comprehensive understanding of everyday financial matters such as banking, credit, home finances, planning, investing, and taxes. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A C. Smith M/W 4:00PM-5:30PM

ENST 105 Intro to Environment & Society

This course provides students with an overview of the major concepts, methodologies, and theoretical frameworks employed in the social sciences to study human ecological relations. A primary goal of this course is to highlight the dynamic interplay between society and nature while introducing students to a social science perspective on local and global environmental issues. The implications of social organization, whether political or economic, for ecosystems will surface and provide an opportunity to examine the impact of individual and collective decisions. Another important goal of the course is to use the different theoretical and methodological approaches, as well as the language of the social sciences, to explore broad issues related to environmental justice, critical zone science, and sustainability, connecting the course to the other Introductory courses for the Environmental Studies Program. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Mihalache-O'Keef M/W 4:00PM-5:30PM

INQ 120 Business Ethics in Absentia

Investigates questions of values, individual and communal, from the standpoint of a particular field of learning. The course will teach reasoning skills through reading, writing and oral communication by linking key works with broader traditions of critical reflections on the good life. Students will be encouraged to explore ways in which they can use the course material for their own reflections on what it means to live well. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 120 and INQ 120.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A T. Carpenter M/W 4:00PM-5:30PM