Courses

ACSI 301 Theory of Interest

An introduction to the mathematical theory of interest and preparation for actuary exam FM. Topics include money growth, investment return, annuities, arbitrage, interest rate sensitivity, and immunization. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • STAT-202 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A R. Minton M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

BIOL 190 Exploring Unity in Biology

An investigation of three of six themes central to the field of biology (Information Flow, Matter and Energy Transformation, and Structure/Function Relationships) that lays a foundation of knowledge and skills expected of students who pursue a major and career in biology. (1)Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A C. Lassiter M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

BIOL 230 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

Structure and function of the human body at the cell and organ system levels, covering general cell structure and function, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, and nervous systems. (This class has a strictly enforced registration restriction with preference given to declared Health and Human Performance majors. This course may not be used to satisfy the requirements for the BS or BA in Biology and does not satisfy the "200-level BIOL course" prerequisite for 300-level BIOL courses.) (1) Lecture and Laboratory: 6 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • BIOL-106 OR BIOL-190 OR BIOL-210 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • BIOL-230L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A L. Thibodeaux M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

BIOL 235 General Microbiology

The morphology, taxonomy, ecology, and economic importance of representative microorganisms, with emphasis on bacteria. Human health issues such as sexually transmitted diseases and food safety, and plant health issues will be covered. Microbiological aspects of water and soil will also be examined. Emphasis in the laboratory will be placed on proper application of microbiological techniques. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Take BIOL 110 or be a declared ENVS major, 180 and 190 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take BIOL-235L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.
  • Co-Requirement BIOL-235L-1

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A J. Steinweg M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

BIOL 265 Plant Diversity

The evolutionary relationships, life histories, and field studies of bryophytes, fern and their relatives, and vascular plants. Field trips to appreciate botanical history, farming impacts, and plant development are included. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Take BIOL 110 or be a declared ENVS major, 180 and 190 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take BIOL-265L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.
  • Co-Requirement BIOL-265L-1

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A D. Poli M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

BUAD 225 Accounting Principles II

Continuation of broad understanding of how accounting principles, accounting practices, and financial data assist decision makers. Topics include corporations,analysis of accounting information, and managerial accounting, including cost accounting, planning, and control. PC applications are utilized. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • BUAD-215 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B A. Mulder M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

CHEM 112 General Chemistry II

The introductory course in chemistry. (Appropriate for all science majors,including chemistry, biochemistry, pre-medical, pre-dental, pharmacy and paramedical students.Credit cannot be earned for both CHEM 111 and CHEM 117 or for both CHEM 112 and CHEM 118) (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CHEM-111.or CHEM-117 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take CHEM-112L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A B. Huddle M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

CHEM 332 Physical Chemistry II

The physical aspects of chemical phenomena, including the properties of solids, liquids, gases and solutions; thermodynamics; kinetics; electrochemistry; and elementary quantum theory. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CHEM-331 is a prerequsite for CHEM-332 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take CHEM-332L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.
  • CHEM-255 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Co-Requirement CHEM-332L-1

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A K. Anderson M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

CHEM 340 Pharmaceutical Chemistry

A study of the chemistry of pharmaceuticals, with emphasis on the molecular-level interactions between drugs and the body. Drug metabolism, drug-receptor interactions, and drug development are explored with case studies including cancer drugs, opiates, and antibiotics. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CHEM 222. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A C. Sarisky M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

CJUS 211 Criminal Justice

An introductory analysis of the crimina l justice system in the United States, i ts structure, processes, and problems. L ecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A B. Tainer-Parkins M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

COMM 254 Rhetorical Traditions

Rhetoric permeates all aspects of social life and has been studied since the 5th century BCE. This course is a survey of the historical development of philosophies or theories of rhetoric from ancient Greece to the present day. It will cover major figures and movements within the discipline of Communication Studies. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • COMM-101. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Turpin M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

COMM 354 Rhetorical Theory & Criticism

In this course students will think, analyze, and write carefully about public messages that influence our experience, professions, lives and cultures. This course will explore the possibilities and difficulties of forming, using, and evaluating messages that individuals or groups use to influence or change a large public audience. (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • COMM-254. Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • COMM-250 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A N. Martinez-Carrillo M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

CPSC 395 Analysis of Algorithms

Introduction to the analysis of algorithms. Students will revisit various algorithm design techniques, learn methods to analyze the computational complexity of the resulting algorithms, and study complexity classes to differentiate between tractable and intractable problems. (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • CPSC-250 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • MATH-131 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Sekoni M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

ECON 122 Principles, Macro

An introduction to contemporary economic discourse, with an emphasis on aggregate concepts and problems such as unemployment, inflation, growth, and international trade and the role of government in dealing with these problems. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A G. Fleming M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

ENGL 315 Res Meth & Critical Perspectiv

An introduction to the methods of literary study that engages major debates and issues in the discipline, approaches to the elements and conventions of genre, and a sampling of literary perspectives and their critical applications. Students will learn to integrate their arguments with critical sources, bringing the critics' approaches to bear in the interception and appreciation of literary texts. This course will help students develop the skills necessary to produce a well-researched, scholarly essay. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • One 200-level ENGL literature course. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A W. Larson-Harris M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

ENST 103 Intro to Environment & Culture

In order to think critically about Environmental Studies, this course will ask you to question how you describe, explain, and relate to nature through language, ideology, and media. To do this we will examine conceptions of nature drawn from the Humanities: philosophy, religion, literature, and art. An understanding of these disciplines will help us gain insight into contemporary environmental debates. The class will examine some of the following questions: What is our relationship to nature? How does nature have value? How has religion contributed to our conceptions of nature? How has English as a language and literary tradition evolved different ways of expressing our relationship to the natural world? Have recent environmental activists articulated a compelling rhetoric? Links to themes of environmental justice, science of the critical zone, and sustainability, connecting this course to the other two introductory courses for the Environmental Studies Program. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A L. Hartman M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

FREN 201 Intermediate French I

A review of grammar. Selected reading, conversation, culture and composition. L ecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Clifton M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

GNDR 150 Intro: Gender & Woman Studies

An introduction to key questions, concepts, and debates within the field of Gender and Women's Studies and a basic grounding in the historical movements in which gender equality is fought for. The fundamentally interdisciplinary nature of Gender & Women's Studies is emphasized by regular guest lectures from faculty across the curriculum. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A K. McGraw M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

GRMN 102 Elementary German II

A study of the fundamental structures of German, with emphasis on oral proficiency and communication. Includes cultural topics. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. for each; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. for each. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A S. Fowler M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

HHP 225 Cont Issues in Sport Mgmt.

A study of the sports industry through examination of problems and issues faced by contemporary sport managers. Unique characteristics of sport and resulting social and ethical responsibilities of sport managers are discussed. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • HHP-221 or permission Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A S. Yoo M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

HHP 413 Therapeutic Exerc/Sports Med

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of exercise for the prevention and rehabilitation of athletic injuries. It will focus on the design and implementation of functional exercise progressions utilized in the rehabilitation process. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Admission to Athletic Training major or successful Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • completion of BIOL-230 and permission

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A J. Buriak M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

HIST 231 The Reformation

The religious reformations of the 16th century and their environment: political, social, economic, intellectual, and religious. (This course counts toward major credit in the Religion-Philosophy major. History 231 and Religion 212 may not both be taken for credit.) (Cross-listed as RELG 212). Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A M. Hakkenberg M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

HNRS 120 True Freedom

Investigates questions of values, individual and communal, from the standpoint of a particular field of learning. The course will teach reasoning skills through reading, writing, and oral communication by linking key works with broader traditions of critical reflections on the good life. Students will be encouraged to explore ways which they can use the course material for their own reflections on what it means to live well. Includes an engagement component that reaches beyond the classroom. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 120 and INQ 120.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • HNRS-110 or permission Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A B. Adkins M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

I.R. 233 International Law

An examination of the nature, structure, functions, and evolution of the international legal system. The impact of international law in the behavior of international actors and the dynamics of the international system will be explored. (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • POLI-111 or permission. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A J. Snow M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 120 Ethical Tradition & Good Life

Investigates questions of values, individual and communal, from the standpoint of a particular field of learning. The course will teach reasoning skills through reading, writing and oral communication by linking key works with broader traditions of critical reflections on the good life. Students will be encouraged to explore ways in which they can use the course material for their own reflections on what it means to live well. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 120 and INQ 120.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
O R. Willingham M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 120 An Ethical Affair?

Investigates questions of values, individual and communal, from the standpoint of a particular field of learning. The course will teach reasoning skills through reading, writing and oral communication by linking key works with broader traditions of critical reflections on the good life. Students will be encouraged to explore ways in which they can use the course material for their own reflections on what it means to live well. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 120 and INQ 120.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
T2 J. Jackl M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 240 Here's to Your Health

Provides an inquiry-focused introduction to statistical methodologies. Students will gain an understanding of how decision making is accomplished using modern statistical techniques. Topics include descriptive statistics, graphical methods,estimation, elementary probability, and statistical inference; students will apply the techniques of data analysis to data sets and statistical studies that address the course theme. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 240 and INQ-240.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A1 J. Minton M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 241 Running the World Efficiently

Further develops the ability to use quantitative, mathematical, and computational reasoning by exploring a problem or issue. Through a focused topic, students gain insight into mathematics or computer science as a mode of inquiry. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 241 and INQ 241.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • INQ-240, HNRS-240, or a Mathematics or Statistics course; Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • sophomore standing is recommended

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A1 K. Saoub M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 250BI How Organisms Evolve

Introduces the methodologies of the natural sciences through an inquiry-focused approach to a topic. Students will explore the types of questions that science asks and how it attempts to answer them by defining and classifying information, developing models, identifying patterns, and drawing conclusions based upon data. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS-250 and INQ-250 from the same discipline.) (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Take INQ-250BIL Must be taken at the same time as this course.
  • Co-Requirement INQ-250BIL-1

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A S. Powers M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 250CH Chemistry & Crime

Introduces the methodologies of the natural sciences through an inquiry-focused approach to a topic. Students will explore the types of questions that science asks and how it attempts to answer them by defining and classifying information, developing models, identifying patterns, and drawing conclusions based upon data. Credit cannot be received for both HNRS-250 and INQ-250 from the same discipline.) (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • INQ-250CHL Must be taken at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A2 E. Hardy M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 260PS Global Politics&Globalization

Introduces the methodologies of the social sciences through an inquiry-focused approach to a topic. The course seeks to develop students' critical thinking skills through the exploration and application of social scientific methods. Individual sections will be taught in a particular discipline. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 260 and INQ 260 from the same discipline.) (1) Lecture: 3hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
G E. Rossmiller M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 260SO Culture & Society

Introduces the methodologies of the social sciences through an inquiry-focused approach to a topic. The course seeks to develop students' critical thinking skills through the exploration and application of social scientific methods. Individual sections will be taught in a particular discipline. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 260 and INQ 260 from the same discipline.) (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B K. Myers M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 270 Ancient Latin America-Global

Develops a sense of historical perspective and the ability to use the methodologies of the humanities or the fine arts by exploring a subject drawn from the period before 1500. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 270 and INQ 270.) (1) Lecture 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
G3 M. Wallace Fuentes M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

INQ 300 End of the World As We Know It

Asks students to look back on their experiences and their work in the Intellectual Inquiry Curriculum in order to make explicit, meaningful connections to contemporary issues. In addition to individual written assignments, students will work in small groups to research and develop a proposal concerning a concept, approach, or solution to a problem that will be presented in a formal defense. (Credit cannot be received for both HNRS 300 and INQ 300.) (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A N. Wisnefske M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

MATH 278 Foundations of Geometry

A review of Euclidean geometry and an introduction to non-Euclidean geometries, with a special focus on the theoretical framework of various geometric systems. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • MATH-131. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A M. Rahmoeller M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

MUSC 251 Music Theory I

Diatonic harmony and voice leading; melodic harmonization and figured bass realization; basic species counterpoint; introduction to tonal theory, and harmonic analysis. Lecture: 3 hr/wk.; Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • MUSC-150 or competency Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take MUSC-251L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A G. Marsh M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

PHST 301 Introduction to Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the sceince of public health. This course is designed to introduce you to the philosophy, purpose, and basic methods of epidemiology. Epidemiology helps us understand how diseases are distributed in populations, including demanding that we investigate and analyze social determinants. If we want to remedy health-related problems and build a healthier, safer social world, this is crucial. Epidemiology lays the foundation for all public health practice. It is a scientific way of thinking about causes and effect. Epidemiology is used to investigate disease outbreaks, determine the natural history of disease, set resource priorities, and develop policies. Basic epidemiologic theory and techniques, applicable to public health practice, will be introduced. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • PHST-201 AND PHST-202 or permission. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A K. Schorpp M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

PHYS 104 Fundamental Physics II

Algebra-and trigonometry-based introduction to classical mechanics including the equations of motion, forces, erengy, mementum, rotation, fluid dynamics, waves and sound. (May not be taken for credit by students who have completed Physics 202.) (1)Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • PHYS 102 or PHYS 103 or PHYS 201. Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take PHYS-104L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A H. Assi M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

PHYS 201 Newtonian Mechanics

Calculus-based, introduction to classical mechanics inclduing forceses and motion, energy, momentum, rotation, fluid dynamics, waves and sound.(1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • MATH-121 or MATH-118 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • Take PHYS-201L Must be taken either prior to or at the same time as this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A M. Fleenor M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

PHYS 299 Sp Top: Fluid Mechanics

Introductory Special Topics courses will provide significant review of fundamental physical concepts and phenomena within a specific sub-disciplinary context. These courses will display how various phenomena in physics are applied to sub-disciplinary questions and how seemingly disparate concepts fit together within the particular sub-discippline. Introductory Special Topics coursework is intended for students at all levels within the physics program, from potential minor to upper-level major. Course may be repeated for credit. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • MATH-118 OR MATH-121 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • PHYS-201 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A E. Aguirre M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

POLI 233 International Law

An examination of the nature, structure, functions, and evolution of the international legal system. The impact of international law in the behavior of international actors and the dynamics of the international system will be explored. (Cross-listed with I.R. 233). (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • POLI-111 or permission Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A J. Snow M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

PSYC 101 Introduction to Psychology

An overview of the field of psychology w ith emphasis on basic processes in human behavior. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B D. Hilton M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

PSYC 221 Developmental Psychology

An examination of development of the individual across the lifespan (i.e., from conception until death). (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • PSYC-101 or INQ-260PY or HNRS-260PY. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A D. Powell M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

PSYC 390 History of Psychology

Examines the major philosophical and scientific trends that led to the establishment of scientific psychology, as well as the early paradigms and systems that helped shape modern psychology. This course also includes a careers component focused on preparing students for entering graduate school and/or the job market. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • Three or more PSYC courses or permission. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A C. Buchholz M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

RELG 212 The Reformation

The Protestant Reformation of the 16th century and the Roman Catholic reaction. (Religion 212 and History 231 may not both be taken for credit.) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A M. Hakkenberg M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SOCI 315 Political Sociology

An analysis of power, politics, the state, and international entities from a sociological perspective. Topics include power and authority, political and economic systems, inequality, political parties, social movements, nation-states, and globalization. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • One 200-level SOCI course or permission Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A M. Berntson M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SOCI 350 Social Theory

An examination of enduring influences of social theorists-notably Durkheim, Marx, and Weber-on the development of sociological knowledge and practice. (1) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • SOCI-201. Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A S. Anderson M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SPAN 102 Elementary Spanish II

A study of the essentials of Spanish grammar and basic vocabulary to promote speaking, listening, reading, and writing skills. Emphasis on developing the conversational skills and cultural awareness to handle topics of everyday life in Spanish. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. for each; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. for each. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B I. Myers M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I

A review of the essentials of Spanish g rammar with the introduction of advanced structures. Continued development of th e four essential skills, and further acq uisition of vocabulary. Emphasis on conv ersational skills to handle situations o f everyday life with increased range of personal expression. Inclusion of cultur al material. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. for each ; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. for each. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
B C. Stanley M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM
C S. Hord M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SPAN 202 Intermediate Spanish II

A review of the essentials of Spanish grammar with the introduction of advanced structures. Continued development of the four essential skills, and further acquisition of vocabulary. Emphasis on conversational skills to handle situations of everyday life with increased range of personal expression. Inclusion of cultural material. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. for each; Laboratory: 1 hr/wk. for each. 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A L. Talbot M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SPAN 303 Spanish Composition

Practice in written expression with an intensive review of Spanish grammar. Introduction to the principles of Spanish style and techniques of formal writing and translation. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • SPAN-202 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A A. Arias Alvarez M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SPAN 304 Spanish Conversation

Practice in oral self-expression and listening comprehension. (This course is for non-native speakers of Spanish.) Lecture: 3 hrs/wk.; Laboratory work. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • SPAN-202 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A T. Hancock-Parmer M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

SPAN 323 Intro to Literature: Span Amer

A study of literary works by major Spanish-American writers from the colonial era through contemporary times with a careful consideration of contexts and an analysis of literary style. Lecture: 3 hrs/wk. 1 Unit

Requisites

  • SPAN-303 Must be taken prior to taking this course.
  • SPAN-304 Must be taken prior to taking this course.

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A J. Banuelos Montes M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM

THEA 101 Fundamentals of Theatre

An introduction to the collaborative art of theatre and dramatic literature through lectures, discussion of basic artistic components involved in the theatrical process, and attending live theatre. (1) 1 Unit

Offerings

Section Instructor Time Comments
A J. Ruhland M/W/F 9:40AM-10:40AM