Bryan Parsons Profile

Dr. Bryan Parsons

Assistant Professor

Department: Public Affairs
Office: 203 Francis T. West Hall
540-375-4967

parsons@roanoke.edu

Courses

Degrees

Ph.D., Political Science, University of South Carolina
B.S., Political Science, Appalachian State University

Homepage

bryanmparsons.weebly.com/

Research & Teaching Interests

U.S. Public Policy (Education, Health), Federalism, Political Behavior

Recent Publications

"The Effects of Risk, Beliefs, and Trust in Education Policy Networks: The Case of Autism and Special Education." Policy Studies Journal, forthcoming. Published online ahead of print, February 15, 2018. [link]

"Local Autism Policy Networks: Expertise and Intermediary Organizations." Educational Policy, forthcoming. Published online ahead of print, October 24, 2016. [link]

“The Social Identity Politics of Peer Networks.” American Politics Research 43 (July 2015): 680-707. [link]

“Making Connections: Performance Regimes and Extreme Events.” Coauthored with Ann O’M. Bowman. Public Administration Review 73 (January/February 2013): 63-73. [link]

Recent Conference Papers

“Advocacy Coalitions in U.S. Special Education: Core Beliefs and Competing Models of Disability Policy.” Coauthored with Adam Johnston. To be presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, New Orleans, LA, January 2018.

"Core Beliefs, Trust, and Collaboration in Local Autism Policy Networks." Annual Meeting of the American Political Science Association, Philadelphia, PA, September 1-4, 2016.

"Autism and Local Policy Networks: A Study of Virginia Communities." Annual Meeting of the Southern Political Science Association, San Juan, Puerto Rico, January 7-9, 2016.

Curriculum Vitae

CV

Available as a Media resource for the following topics

U.S. politics, education policy, health policy, state and local politics, elections and voting behavior

Willing to speak to professional, social or civic groups on

U.S. politics, education policy, health policy, state and local politics, elections and voting behavior